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Bazinga_1

Confused About Visa Categories For Business Trip

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Hi, 

 

I'm a Canadian Permanent Resident working for a US based company remotely from Canada. We have partnered with a local AU team to launch the service and therefore I need to meet with and train the local team. Since my company has recently registered in AU, which visa category would my trip fall under - Work or Business Activities? 

 

Would appreciate some guidance and help.

 

Regards

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A Visitor visa (subclass 600) will cover you for your trip.

 

This visa lets you visit Australia:

 

- to visit or for business visitor purposes

- for up to three, six or 12 months.

The base application charge for this visa ranges from AUD135 to AUD1000.

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Thanks - A Visitor visa (subclass 600) even though the parent company is registered and has an office in AU?

Will it not fall under the scope of a Skilled Worker visa because of a registered office in AU? Although the training and workshops I intend to conduct are unique and specific to the service. 

 

Regards

 

 

A Visitor visa (subclass 600) will cover you for your trip.

This visa lets you visit Australia:

- to visit or for business visitor purposes
- for up to three, six or 12 months.
The base application charge for this visa ranges from AUD135 to AUD1000.

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Thanks - A Visitor visa (subclass 600) even though the parent company is registered and has an office in AU?

Will it not fall under the scope of a Skilled Worker visa because of a registered office in AU? Although the training and workshops I intend to conduct are unique and specific to the service. 

 

Regards

 

You can not be paid for any work undertaken by you, by an Australian company, person or entity while on a VV 600.  When you are on a VV as a Business Visitor, its assumed you are being paid by your employer from overseas.  

 

Specifically, DIBP state that when on a Business Visitor Visa;

 

"This visa lets you engage in:

  • study or training for up to three months
  • business visitor activities while in Australia, provided you:
    • do not work for or provide services to a business or organisation in Australia
    • do not sell goods or services to the public.

Business visitor activities include:

  • making general business or employment enquiries
  • investigating, negotiating, signing or reviewing a business contract
  • activities carried out as part of an official government-to-government visit
  • participating in conferences, trade fairs or seminars, as long as you are not being paid by the organisers for your participation."

 

 

So in your case, as you are delivering training services, you technically can not do this on a VV 600.  The old 457 Temporary Skill Work Visa, is being reviewed, and in any case is designed for long term workers.

 

I think, you best option will be a   Temporary Work (Short Stay Specialist) visa (subclass 400).  https://www.border.gov.au/Trav/Visa-1/400-


 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

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Hi. Reviving this thread.

I delivered the training remotely, however this time an in-person visit is necessary for further training and infrastructure development. 

Would a Temporary Work (short stay specialist, subclass 400) still qualify for this or a visitor visa (subclass 600)?

Parent company is registered in US and a branch is registered in AU. 

Please advise.

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A Biz 600 should suffice, as long as you are not paid onshore in any form, and the letters of invitation all stack up, and are verifiable.  For a Biz 600 you will need to prove solid employment status back home, a letter from your employer outlining your trip, plus all the other relevant criteria (funds).

TWV 400 is usually used when you will be paid onshore, they are harder to get as;

  • you need to be be invited, or supported, by the organisation you will be working for
  • have specialist skills, knowledge or experience that is needed but cannot be found in Australia

 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

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6 hours ago, AussieDude said:

A Biz 600 should suffice, as long as you are not paid onshore in any form, and the letters of invitation all stack up, and are verifiable.  For a Biz 600 you will need to prove solid employment status back home, a letter from your employer outlining your trip, plus all the other relevant criteria (funds).

TWV 400 is usually used when you will be paid onshore, they are harder to get as;

  • you need to be be invited, or supported, by the organisation you will be working for
  • have specialist skills, knowledge or experience that is needed but cannot be found in Australia

 

I will not be paid onshore however it is stated that I must not be:

  • undertaking work for or providing goods or services to a business or person based in Australia,
  • selling goods or services directly to the general public while in Australia.

This has just further confused me. The purpose of my visit does not include the permitted business activities which are:

  • making general business or employment enquiries
    investigating, negotiating, signing or reviewing a business contract
  • activities carried out as part of an official government-to-government visit
  • participating in conferences, trade fairs or seminars, as long as you are not being paid by the organisers for your participation.

My purpose is to visit the AU office to provide some proprietary training to the local team. This knowledge/skill set is not available otherwise in AU because it is proprietary software. 

Would the Short Stay Specialist not work here? Because it seems the Business 600 is restrictive in my case.

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10 hours ago, Bazinga_1 said:

 

I will not be paid onshore however it is stated that I must not be:

  • undertaking work for or providing goods or services to a business or person based in Australia,
  • selling goods or services directly to the general public while in Australia.

This has just further confused me. The purpose of my visit does not include the permitted business activities which are:

  • making general business or employment enquiries
    investigating, negotiating, signing or reviewing a business contract
  • activities carried out as part of an official government-to-government visit
  • participating in conferences, trade fairs or seminars, as long as you are not being paid by the organisers for your participation.

My purpose is to visit the AU office to provide some proprietary training to the local team. This knowledge/skill set is not available otherwise in AU because it is proprietary software. 

Would the Short Stay Specialist not work here? Because it seems the Business 600 is restrictive in my case.

The SSS visa is more suited to what you will be doing, and they are generally issued for longer.  I imagine your local subsidiary will use an agent for all he applications, and they will advise.  But I think a SSS is the way to go.


 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

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6 hours ago, AussieDude said:

The SSS visa is more suited to what you will be doing, and they are generally issued for longer.  I imagine your local subsidiary will use an agent for all he applications, and they will advise.  But I think a SSS is the way to go.

 

Thanks for your response. 

Is the SSS visa something I can apply on my own or does the AU office need to apply for me? 

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On 9/16/2018 at 5:19 AM, Bazinga_1 said:

 

Thanks for your response. 

Is the SSS visa something I can apply on my own or does the AU office need to apply for me? 

I think, either.  Usually the Au office manages it all,  BUt I have seen when you apply, usually, but your AU office must provide the invitation and sponsorship letters.  I welcome my forum colleagues to clarify for me..


 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

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