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Organising My Health Examinations Upfront

health examinations upfornt

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#1 Mims

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 08:46 PM

Hi, I am on a bridging visa awaiting processing, and already 6 months have passed. I was wondering if I could go ahead with doing my health examinations upfront. 

I've got this information from here - http://www.border.go...ons-upfront.pdf

 

It is said that if I have lodged my application already I should wait till I receive the request for health examination, because doing it now can result in delays.

Although I know there is a time frame for the response and I know appointments for doctors can take weeks to get, I want to avoid frustration.

 

Please, someone that is familiar to advise if that would be a good move. 

I've been reading earlier of how someone got sick just before the exams and it turned everything upside down.

Waiting is nerve cracking.

 

Please, advise.

Maria




#2 Mims

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Posted 03 September 2017 - 08:49 PM

This is my situation, but I am worried about completing "these examinations within a certain time period".

 

"I have already lodged my Australian visa application

You will be advised by email or by your case officer what health examinations you need to do (if any). You will then be requested to complete these examinations within a certain time period. Please wait until your visa case officer contacts you, do not use the My Health Declarations service if you have already lodged a visa application. It will delay processing of your visa application.
Note: To minimise processing delays, you should complete your required health examinations as soon as possible after your case officer has advised you to do so."  (from http://www.border.go...lth-examination )




#3 Aussie_83

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Posted 04 September 2017 - 09:48 PM

you can but the medicals are only valid for 12 months so depending on what visa you applied for and the average processing time you might be better off waiting a bit longer. if you don't mind paying for a second lot of medicals then go for it.


#4 Mims

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Posted 05 September 2017 - 12:34 PM

What if I get sick while I am waiting for them to contact me? It had cost me already so much and if some desiese ruins my all hard work and efforts, I'd rather die before that. Sorry for being like that, but I've read it happens every day.
I tried to get the forms, but it says everywhere not to do it prior.
I also want to do some travelling, but I guess I am now tied up waiting.
Anyway...


#5 AussieDude

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Posted 07 September 2017 - 10:16 PM

Being sick during the examination is not a problem, assuming its a minor illness.  

 

The examination is looking for SERIOUS illnesses and conditions that could cost the Aussie government a lot of money in the long term, (i.e TB or if you had a serious long term debilitating condition i.e Cancer).

 

So turning up with flu or similar is not a problem.

 

You can travel while waiting for your visa to process.  Be sure to keep DIBP updated on where you are, if its a long trip.




#6 Mims

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 09:22 PM

Thank you for your kind reply, so I should exclude the possibility to get cancer while I wait?

 

I guess anyone can get cancer, no one is insured against that illness. 

 

I met a person that had a cancer history 5 years ago. Had clear blood tests before applying for visa, considering himself cured, then while waiting for processing the cancer hits back, after 9 months in waiting.

 

On one side is the illness, on the other is the Australian Government with the cancer "no visa grant" policy. What should he worry about - his life, or his visa? He also has nowhere to go back, all relatives are in Australia. 

That's why I started worrying about myself, and I thought of doing medicals while I am still well.

 

My friend is not eligible for wavier (some visas are eligible).

No chance of a last will have been given to people with the life sentence "cancer".

I've done some research, and it is unbelievable how every day we donate to cancer research, for kids with cancer, and yet at the same time people with cancer get treatment like they have gotten sick on purpose.

 

Has anyone here passed the health tests with cancer or any other terminal illness?

Or anyone that had their application refused because of cancer?

 

Tha




#7 AussieDude

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Posted 12 October 2017 - 11:12 PM

Mims, 

 

A couple of clarifications. 

 

Firstly, you said "getting cancer while I wait", I am not sure if you are being serious or taking the piss out of me. 

 

Cancer is a serious illness and not a joke. I take offence to you generalising that Cancer is a life sentence, or a terminal illness.  Some Cancers are terminal, many are not.  I have 3 Cancer survivors in my family.

 

Cancer is not an immediate rejection on medical grounds by the Au.Gov.  Only a few conditions (infectious TB, ebola etc) fall into that category.  As cancer is not contagious in any way it will be a determination over the long term medical costs to treat you. Yes in some cases waivers are available, and in some cases are not.  Its dependant on the type and stage of the cancer.

 

Most cancer suffers do not know they have the condition until symptoms arise, this can be months to years later, hence all the effort on early detection.

 

What is the point you are trying to make, aside from upsetting any cancer sufferers/survivors on this forum?




#8 Mims

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 05:32 AM

Upsetting is the fact, that while this person is living the nightmare of possible visa refusal, after such a long wait and cost, while things are getting out of control - there is NO wavier in his case.

 

It is upsetting that in cancer cases people have to take care of their health, rather than worry about being sent back to "nowhere" (with their kids).

 

Upsetting is also the fact that since 3 months of the first detection he has been sent to different specialists and everyone say "no, we don't operate recurrence" 

 

3 months since then, biopsy has not been done - I suppose that bridging visa is not the reason. But this is real. 

 

I feel he's been left out - and anyone can get in this situation. I am desperate to find out if there is any hope for this person. Please, do not tell me I am trying to take piss on anyone. This is very serious. It can happen to me - I am a human, and cancer is not a rare illness in Australia. Please, if there is hope for that person - I want to know if anyone has been sent home, or passed the test - in real life.




#9 AussieDude

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Posted 13 October 2017 - 07:32 AM

I understand your concern.  Please stop assuming that all cancers are treated the same. There is always hope I believe.  Until their is a final decision from the Chief Medical Officer, on his case, you can not state that a waiver is not available in his case. I have seen waivers granted for some very serious illnesses.

 

To your question, I know of several cases where an Immigration visa was issued to a sufferer, some of those cases required waivers. I also know of several cases where the visa was refused, pending treatment in their home country. I also know of a case where the visa was refused due to advanced and terminal nature of that individuals condition.  No one should postpone medical treatment while waiting for a visa decision.

 

No one gets sent home if they are on a PR, unless you are caught intentionally lying and falsifying the medical declaration, even then, although possible, I have never heard of a case of medical deportation. That would be inhuman.  Once the visa is granted (Assuming no conditions/waivers), Medicare will look after your medical expenses for life, while you are in Australia.

 

Can you give us more specific details about your friend, do you know the type of cancer & stage?

 

What country is he in?

 

Has he applied for a Visa, what type?

 

Has he undergone his visa medicals?







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