Jump to content
Erased

Tourist Visa for A Thai

Recommended Posts

Hi, I was after some advice for a more unusual situation on getting a tourist visa for my Thai partner.

I am hoping to get a Tourist visa for her to Australia for a couple of months to see how she likes it. We have been together for just on 2 years, with me staying with her in Thailand when on leave.

My work situation has change and I will be spending the near future more in Australia.

The issue that we have is that when I met her she was a freelance prostitute but since we met she moved home and I support her fully financially. She doesn’t hold a job nor has an income besides me.

The questions.

Does she need an income, job or a certain amount of money in the bank to get a tourist visa?

Should I put money in her bank account for the visa, say $10,000AUD? if not how much?

Will her past affect her chances of getting a visa, she doesn’t have any criminal history, but also has no work history.

What information should I include about my situation, I am TSPV for my job which they will know if I include my details? Does your employment hold much sway in the process?

Can I sponsor her for the visa, as I don't mind paying a bond?

Thanks for your assistance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Erased said:

Hi, I was after some advice for a more unusual situation on getting a tourist visa for my Thai partner.

I am hoping to get a Tourist visa for her to Australia for a couple of months to see how she likes it. We have been together for just on 2 years, with me staying with her in Thailand when on leave.

My work situation has change and I will be spending the near future more in Australia.

The issue that we have is that when I met her she was a freelance prostitute but since we met she moved home and I support her fully financially. She doesn’t hold a job nor has an income besides me.

The questions.

Does she need an income, job or a certain amount of money in the bank to get a tourist visa?

Should I put money in her bank account for the visa, say $10,000AUD? if not how much?

Will her past affect her chances of getting a visa, she doesn’t have any criminal history, but also has no work history.

What information should I include about my situation, I am TSPV for my job which they will know if I include my details? Does your employment hold much sway in the process?

Can I sponsor her for the visa, as I don't mind paying a bond?

Thanks for your assistance.

Welcome to the Australian Visa Forum,

It is an assessment of the applicant's circumstances that will determine whether they meet the criteria for the grant of a visitor visa. Many factors are taken into consideration, such as age, sex, nationality, employment, savings, history of visa compliance, family ties in own country etc. Based on what you have posted, if your girlfriend was to apply she would certainly be refused. Any chance of success will come down to the strength of your letter of support, and whether it is strong enough so that sufficient weight can be attached to it. What evidence of contact/support do you have with her for the period you have known her?   

Depositing money into her account is a very BAD idea. Recently deposited funds without evidence of a savings history or explanation as to where they came from will be viewed as deposited for the sole purpose of satisfying the adequate funds criteria. Good way to get a refusal IMHO. If you want to support (which you would need to do anyway) that support would be covered in your letter of support. 

Lastly, there is no provision to pay a bond as she is not eligible for a sponsored family visitor visa.

Excuse my ignorance, but what is TSPV?

 


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a lot of evidence of support as I have been fully supporting her for the last 2 years. I have also renovated her house although the house is not in her name (parents), bought her a motorbike etc. I have bank records to show all of this.

Every period of leave I have had has been spent with her, again can show this as well as very regular contact when possible and can give evidence of this and evidence for the gaps.

TSPV is my security clearance level, again all of the information about us has been disclosed already as part of this.

I thought that @Nightcall said that person needed a minimum amount of money in their bank account and to lend them the money to show they have funds to cover the stay. As they don’t have any source of income besides me, it doesn’t bother me to put 10 grand in their account if need be.

I also read here on the forum, that a support letter carries little if any weight and that offering financial support via the letter isn’t viewed as support, that the only thing that is, is money in the person's account.

Thanks for your help and answering my question.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Erased said:

I have a lot of evidence of support as I have been fully supporting her for the last 2 years. I have also renovated her house although the house is not in her name (parents), bought her a motorbike etc. I have bank records to show all of this.

Every period of leave I have had has been spent with her, again can show this as well as very regular contact when possible and can give evidence of this and evidence for the gaps.

TSPV is my security clearance level, again all of the information about us has been disclosed already as part of this.

I thought that @Nightcall said that person needed a minimum amount of money in their bank account and to lend them the money to show they have funds to cover the stay. As they don’t have any source of income besides me, it doesn’t bother me to put 10 grand in their account if need be.

I also read here on the forum, that a support letter carries little if any weight and that offering financial support via the letter isn’t viewed as support, that the only thing that is, is money in the person's account.

Thanks for your help and answering my question.

You clearly haven't read what AFV posted have you?

 

 

 


Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 hours ago, Erased said:

I have a lot of evidence of support as I have been fully supporting her for the last 2 years. I have also renovated her house although the house is not in her name (parents), bought her a motorbike etc. I have bank records to show all of this.

Every period of leave I have had has been spent with her, again can show this as well as very regular contact when possible and can give evidence of this and evidence for the gaps.

TSPV is my security clearance level, again all of the information about us has been disclosed already as part of this.

I thought that @Nightcall said that person needed a minimum amount of money in their bank account and to lend them the money to show they have funds to cover the stay. As they don’t have any source of income besides me, it doesn’t bother me to put 10 grand in their account if need be.

I also read here on the forum, that a support letter carries little if any weight and that offering financial support via the letter isn’t viewed as support, that the only thing that is, is money in the person's account.

Thanks for your help and answering my question.

 

As per my earlier reply, any chance of success will come down to the strength of your letter of support, and whether it is strong enough so that sufficient weight can be attached to it. It is as simple as that.  


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@Erased listen to what is being said here. My girlfriends first visa was refused because she got bad advice from a Thai visa agent to put money into her account. What AFV is saying is 1000% correct. I wish I had found this forum before we did her first application last year. My original post is here: Thai girlfriend refused tourist visa to visit Australia. For her next application, I included a strong letter of support with plenty of evidence of contact. We were over the moon when she got her visa granted. She came to Australia for 2 months and we are now in the process of preparing her prospective marriage visa application. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, Erased said:

I thought that @Nightcall said that person needed a minimum amount of money in their bank account and to lend them the money to show they have funds to cover the stay. As they don’t have any source of income besides me, it doesn’t bother me to put 10 grand in their account if need be.

No I didn’t say that, I agree with AFV that it’s the worst possible thing you can do, anyone who tells you to do this clearly has no idea what they are doing and you should avoid them.
There is no requirement for your partner to have any money in a bank account or even a bank account at all. The requirement is that they are able to support their stay and that can be evidenced in any number of ways.

9 hours ago, Erased said:

I also read here on the forum, that a support letter carries little if any weight and that offering financial support via the letter isn’t viewed as support, that the only thing that is, is money in the person's account.

I am not sure where you have read that, as its completely incorrect, I agree with AFV that a well written support letter is the key with getting the visa, as long as your properly evidence any claim you make. I often tell people, think of it like explaining the situation to someone who doesn’t know either of you and is justifiable sceptical of the situation without it being personal. 

Given your security clearance and I assume your job, your letter of support will carry the most weight in the visa application and you should have a good chance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, AFV said:

As per my earlier reply, any chance of success will come down to the strength of your letter of support, and whether it is strong enough so that sufficient weight can be attached to it. It is as simple as that.  

100% agree with AFV here. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/20/2019 at 8:07 PM, Erased said:

The questions.

Does she need an income, job or a certain amount of money in the bank to get a tourist visa?

No, but it helps.

On 1/20/2019 at 8:07 PM, Erased said:

Should I put money in her bank account for the visa, say $10,000AUD? if not how much?

No never put money in someone's bank account for a visa, it raises so many flags with the department, it's the worst advice you can possible get. Much better just explaining the situation.

On 1/20/2019 at 8:07 PM, Erased said:

Will her past affect her chances of getting a visa, she doesn’t have any criminal history, but also has no work history.

Not her past, but the lack of job will make it harder to show she has a reason to return at the end of the visa. Again can be covered in a support letter or statement.

On 1/20/2019 at 8:07 PM, Erased said:

What information should I include about my situation, I am TSPV for my job which they will know if I include my details? Does your employment hold much sway in the process?

Your employment will hold a fair bit of sway, I would include as much details as possible, job title, payslips, leave requests, clearance, length of employment, tax returns etc

On 1/20/2019 at 8:07 PM, Erased said:

Can I sponsor her for the visa, as I don't mind paying a bond?

 No you can only sponsor family members and it's a slightly different visa anyway.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Erased said:

I believe that I did? can you tell me what you're talking about as I don't get your comment?

Perhaps Bridge was referring to the fact that I clearly explained the reasons why depositing money into your girlfriend's account was not a good idea (and it isn't) but you don't seem to have taken it on board. At the end of the day, however, your money your decision, 


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, AFV said:

As per my earlier reply, any chance of success will come down to the strength of your letter of support, and whether it is strong enough so that sufficient weight can be attached to it. It is as simple as that.  

Thanks for your answer, I was confused about a letter of support as in this thread 

its says 

On 10/27/2018 at 5:08 PM, AussieDude said:

What you must not forget is that regardless of these 'offers' of support, the applicant must meet the basic criteria on their own merits.  The most common aspect being the applicants need to prove they have sufficient funds in their own name for the length of the stay. They must be in the applicants name, as there have been many cases when an invited visitor arrives, under the financial support of a resident, to only find the relationship has ended the day they arrive and they are left penniless in Australia. It does not matter of you have $10Million in your account, if the applicant has none, or insufficient, then they will be denied a visa.  We do see some cases when this rule is relaxed, but generally IMMI want to see the funds in the applicants account.

Naturally a solid letter of offer from you to support the applicants stay, will reduce the amount of money IMMI will expect the applicant to have under their name, but not remove the requirement altogether.

So in summary, offers and letters of support may assist an applicant's application, but will NOT negate the need for the applicant to meet the financial requirements on their own merit.

I took this to mean it didn't hold much value unless they met all the other requirements, which my partner doesn't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Nightcall said:

No I didn’t say that, I agree with AFV that it’s the worst possible thing you can do, anyone who tells you to do this clearly has no idea what they are doing and you should avoid them.
There is no requirement for your partner to have any money in a bank account or even a bank account at all. The requirement is that they are able to support their stay and that can be evidenced in any number of ways.

I am sorry I thought it was you as I been reading a lot of your post. I have looked again it was AussieDude here 

On 8/25/2018 at 9:03 AM, AussieDude said:

Not sure how long ago her first Visa was, but they have really tightened up on the requirement for sufficient funds being in her name, and not yours.  Just lend her the money, get a bank statement and if needed, she can pay you back once onshore.  Its not worth the risk of refusal for such a simple requirement.

As you can understand it's confusing for a newcomer to visa's to understand what's right and wrong information when one person says something on a forum and another says something else. 

It's been a great help to know that a support letter will be as helpful  as you and AFV say, as I think I can explain the situation very well. 

Sorry again and thanks for your information as its been very helpful.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay @Erased I can now see your source of confusion here. 

The issue that your girlfriend will have, is that on an objective assessment of her circumstances she will more than likely not meet the criteria for the grant of visitor visa. Simply putting money into her account will not rectify this situation. Simply having a sizeable bank balance is not the answer. A strong letter of support from you that includes evidence of how long you have known each other, evidence of your ability to support your girlfriend will help sway the balance in her favor. A strong letter of support that the Department can attach weight to will significantly increase the chances of success. 


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, AFV said:

Perhaps Bridge was referring to the fact that I clearly explained the reasons why depositing money into your girlfriend's account was not a good idea (and it isn't) but you don't seem to have taken it on board. At the end of the day, however, your money your decision, 

No I understood it, but there are a number of posts on this forum that says the opposite to your advice. 

Take this one from What Not To Do On An Australian Visa Application

On 12/17/2016 at 12:56 AM, AussieDude said:

 Be sure that she has at least $2000 per month intended stay in HER bank account, not yours.  Lend her the money and take it back when she arrives.  Be sure you letter of invitation states that you will meet all her accommodation, living, travel, phone, and MEDICAL expenses when sh is here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 minutes ago, Erased said:

No I understood it, but there are a number of posts on this forum that says the opposite to your advice. 

Take this one from What Not To Do On An Australian Visa Application

I am going disagree with that post for the reasons I have previously posted. I would never recommend that course of action myself.

Just to give another example, if everyone in your girlfriend's village in Thailand chipped in and put a total of $20,000 into her bank account, and based on the background info you have provided, then the application will still be refused IMHO. However, and without sounding like a broken record here, a letter of support that the Department can attach weight to, even if she has $0 in her bank account, is that one that will be the success.   


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Erased said:

Thanks for your information, don't know why Bridge had to be such a dick about it, this is all new to me. 

You're welcome. Bridge can answer for himself. 


920x113.jpg

Please note that this posting is of a general nature only. It does not constitute legal or migration advice and may not apply to your particular circumstances.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2019 at 8:01 PM, Erased said:

I am sorry I thought it was you as I been reading a lot of your post. I have looked again it was AussieDude here 

As you can understand it's confusing for a newcomer to visa's to understand what's right and wrong information when one person says something on a forum and another says something else. 

It's been a great help to know that a support letter will be as helpful  as you and AFV say, as I think I can explain the situation very well. 

Sorry again and thanks for your information as its been very helpful.

 

I think this chain has been well addressed.  But I will reinforce this;

A letter of support is not sponsorship.  Sponsorship has very defined criteria under Australian IMMI Law.  Some visa's (i.e VV) accept Letters of Support, but, are not eligible for sponsorship.

Its worth taking the time to understand the technical, and agreed subtle, differences between the concept of 'Sponsorship' and 'Support'


 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2019 at 8:11 PM, Erased said:

Thanks for your information, don't know why Bridge had to be such a dick about it, this is all new to me. 

There is no animosity in what @Bridgesaid.  Just a clinical piece of advice.  @Bridgeis the most un 'dick like'  advisor we have here.  


 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/24/2019 at 7:53 PM, Erased said:

Thanks for your answer, I was confused about a letter of support as in this thread 

its says 

I took this to mean it didn't hold much value unless they met all the other requirements, which my partner doesn't.

At the core of every Tourist Visa assessment, are the following principles;

  • The applicant must be assessed as an individual, regardless of friends/family circumstance
  • Regardless of offers of support etc, the applicant must meet the basic criteria (funds, genuine tourist, reason to return, overall risk)
    • i.e $2,000 in Dad's account is not the same as $2,000 in the applicants account
  • Understand that IMMI's mission with regard to assessing Tourist Visa's applicants is;
    • To encourage and support genuine, short term, tourists (visitors) to Australia
    • To identify, and block applicants who demonstrate a high likelihood, or risk, to overstay, work illegally or otherwise use the VV for purposes other than what its intended for
    • To ensure that all visitors to Australia, have the funds and support to realise their stay, and not present as a financial burden to the Australian Taxpayer.
    • To uphold the core principles of the Immigration act with regard to persons of poor character, entering Australia.

 

 

Disclaimer:

Makes me sick, in the fact that I must include a disclaimer. All opinions, advice and comments expressed by me are of my own personal opinion, and not that of a Immigration Agent, Lawyer, or related professional. They are given in the spirit intended, as an independant contributor, to a public forum. No implied, or expressed guarantee or undertaking as to accuracy or relevance is given.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, AussieDude said:

At the core of every Tourist Visa assessment, are the following principles;

The actual core principles are slightly different to what you have posted. They are officially

  • genuinely intend only to visit Australia temporarily
  • not work unlawfully
  • not engage in studies or training for more than 3 months
  • have, or have access to, adequate means to support themselves during the period of the visit so that they do not need to access Australia’s social welfare system 
  • leave Australia on or before the date their visa ceases, unless they make a valid application to stay for a longer period to the benefit of Australia
11 hours ago, AussieDude said:

The applicant must be assessed as an individual, regardless of friends/family circumstance

The applicant is assessed on their individual circumstances, this will include the circumstances of friends and family if applicable. If the applicant is in a relationship with an Australian Citizen/PR there is a requirement that they take fair & reasonable approach in regards to this when assessing a visa.

11 hours ago, AussieDude said:

Regardless of offers of support etc, the applicant must meet the basic criteria (funds, genuine tourist, reason to return, overall risk)

  • i.e $2,000 in Dad's account is not the same as $2,000 in the applicants account

The requirement is (as per the regulations) that they have 'adequate means to support himself or herself; or access to adequate means to support himself or herself; during the period of the applicant's intended stay in Australia.'

Giving advice such as in the above confuses people such as the OP, as to take your example, having $2,000 in Dad's account may meet the requirement, as might not having a bank account in the applicants name, not having any personal savings or not having an income.

The key is as per the requirement, is to either have, or have access to means to support themselves.

If they don't personally have the means to support themselves, they need to provide evidence of how they will have access to it and given the transportability of funds that it will be available and history to show this or some other evidence that can demonstrate it.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...